Modern Greek

Language section number: 403 (How to register for Critical Languages classes)


Nikolaos Balis leads a Modern Greek class session at CLP

Modern Greek refers to the dialects and varieties of the Greek language spoken in the modern era. The end of the Medieval Greek period and the beginning of Modern Greek is often symbolically assigned to the fall of the Byzantine Empire in 1453, even though that date marks no clear linguistic boundary and many characteristic modern features of the language arose centuries earlier, between the fourth and the fifteenth centuries AD. 12 million people claim Modern Greek to be their native language.

Modern Greek is written in the Greek alphabet, which has 24 letters, each with a capital and lowercase (small) form. The letter sigma additionally has a special final form. There are two diacritical symbols, the acute accent which indicates stress and the diaeresis marking a vowel letter as not being part of a digraph. Greek has a mixed historical and phonemic orthography, where historical spellings are used if their pronunciation matches modern usage. The correspondence between consonant phonemes and graphemes is largely unique, but several of the vowels can be spelled in multiple ways.

CLP's Modern Greek Tutor

Nikolaos Balis

This article uses material from the Wikipedia article "Modern Greek", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.